Eight-foot-deep sinkhole opens in Rome revealing ancient paving stones used in the streets around the Pantheon dating back to 27BC



The sinkhole is 10 feet long and opened unexpectedly on an otherwise quiet Sunday in Piazza della Rotunda 

The paving stones from 27BC below the surface appear to have been used in the streets around the Pantheon  

The paving stones were unusually well preserved because they were mostly surrounded by pozzolan


By MICHAEL THOMSEN FOR DAILYMAIL.COM

PUBLISHED: 17:35 BST, 21 May 2020 | UPDATED: 21:56 BST, 21 May 2020


 

로마 판테온 광장 앞, 깊이 2.4m 싱크홀 내려 앉아..."고대 포장용 돌 발견"


   로마의 판테온 앞 거리에 2.4m 깊이의 싱크홀이 발견되면서 BC 27년까지 거슬러 올라가는 몇 개의 고대 포석들이 발견되었다.


이 싱크홀은 길이가 3m이며, 판테온의 앞 계단 근처에 있는 로툰다 광장의 자갈길에서 일요일 오후 갑자기 발생했다.




당시 이 지역은 일반인의 출입이 금지되어 있어 피해가 없었지만 만일 관관철에 발생했더라면 피해가 예상됐던 상황이었다.


'모든 신에게'라는 뜻의 판테온은 고대 로마의 모든 신들의 신전으로 서기 126년경에 하드리아누스 황제에 의해 재건되었다.


그것은 역사적으로 계속 사용되어 왔고, 7세기 이후로 로마 가톨릭 교회로 사용되었다.


황기철 콘페이퍼 에디터 큐레이터

Ki Chul Hwang, conpaper editor, curator


edited by kcontents


An eight-foot-deep sinkhole opened up on a street in front of the Pantheon in Rome, revealing several ancient paving stones dating as far back as 27BC.


The sinkhole is 10 feet long and opened unexpectedly on an otherwise quiet Sunday afternoon on a cobblestoned street in the Piazza della Rotunda, near the Pantheon's front steps.


A sinkhole opened up on the streets of Rome, revealing seven well-preserved paving stones dating back to 27BC




The area had been closed to the public at the time so no one was injured, but during tourist season the event could have caused much more damage.


The sinkhole opened on a Sunday afternoon at a time when the Piazza della Rotunda was closed to the public, which helped ensure no one was injured


With a graceful dome perched high above a massive circular chamber, it is lit by sunlight streaming through the 30ft hole at the dome's apex.


The seven slabs of paving stones were made from travertine, a commonly available building material sourced from nearby quarries in the countryside that was also used to build the Coliseum 




An architectural masterpiece, no one quite knows how they rendered such a large dome from concrete.

Most believe, however, that the hole in its roof is a testament to Rome's warm climate.


The Pantheon - meaning 'to every god' - was commissioned as a temple to all the gods of Ancient Rome, and rebuilt by Emperor Hadrian in about 126 AD.


It has been in continuous use throughout its history and, since the 7th century, has been used as a Roman Catholic church. 

It was built on top of an earlier temple from the rein of Augustus in as far back as 27BC.


This rich history makes it a treasure trove for discoveries.



Sinkholes have become a surprisingly common phenomenon in Rome, with 100 reported in 2019, and 175 in 2018, caused by the city's sandy and unstable ground and the layers of ancient structures buried beneath the surface 




The paving stones below the surface appear to have been used in the streets around the Pantheon when it was first built, and which were subsequently paved over after a series of reconstruction projects in the first century AD.


According to a report in the Smithsonian, city officials had been aware the ancient paving stones were present below the surface but decided against any larger excavation project, fearing it would be disruptive. 


The paving stones were unusually well preserved because they were mostly surrounded by pozzolan, a type of dirt with significant amounts of silico


View full text

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-8341955/Eight-foot-deep-sinkhole-opens-Rome-revealing-paving-stones-used-Pantheon-27BC.html




Eight Foot Deep Sinkhole Open in Rome Revealing 27BC Pantheon Paving Stones  kcontents



Posted by engi, conpaper Engi-

댓글을 달아 주세요