Giant worm-like creature with spoon-shaped FANGS discovered in the Brazilian rainforest may be the only amphibian with a venomous bite


Caecilians are a group of limbless amphibians that are often mistaken for snakes 

Research provides the first known evidence of oral venom glands in amphibians

The fluid-filled glands behind its teeth incapacitate prey like frogs and lizards




 

By JONATHAN CHADWICK FOR MAILONLINE 

PUBLISHED: 16:00 BST, 3 July 2020 | UPDATED: 17:51 BST, 3 July 2020


 

치명적 독성 치아샘 가진 송곳니 벌레 발견


브라질 삼림 속에서


   공포 영화에서 나온 것처럼 보이는 송곳니 '벌레' 종은 독성이 있는 치아샘을 가진 최초의 양서류라고 과학자들은 말한다.


미국과 브라질의 생물학자들은 고리 모양의 카실리아인 개구리, 도롱뇽과 관련된 뱀과 같은 양서류에서 구강샘을 발견했는데 길이가 17인치나 된다.




연구원들은 이미 카실리아들이 독성이 있는 꼬리를 가지고 있고 포식자들을 피하기 위해 지하로 빠르게 잠수할 수 있는 점액 같은 윤활유를 방출한다는 것을 알고 있었다.


그러나 그들은 이제 브라질에서 발견된 링이 달린 까실리의 위턱과 아래턱에서 작은 액체가 채워진 구강샘을 발견해 먹이를 무력화시켰다.


사지가 없고 사냥을 위한 입만 있어도, 카실리아들은 벌레, 흰개미, 개구리, 도마뱀을 물어뜯을 때 구강샘을 활성화시킨다.


황기철 콘페이퍼 에디터

Ki Chul Hwang Conpaper editor curator


edited by kcontents


A species of fanged 'worm' that looks like something from a horror movie is the first known amphibian with toxic dental glands, scientists say. 


US and Brazilian biologists found oral glands in ringed caecilians – serpent-like amphibians related to frogs and salamanders that reach up to 17 inches long. 


Researchers already knew that caecilians have poisonous tails and emit a mucous-like lubricant that enables them to quickly dive underground to escape predators. 


A magnified image of the mouth of a ringed caecilian, Siphonops annulatus, reveals snake-like dental glands (top)


But they've now found tiny fluid-filled oral glands in the upper and lower jaw of the ringed caecilian, which was discovered in Brazil, to incapacitate its prey. 




Despite having no limbs and only a mouth for hunting, caecilians activate the oral glands when they bite down on worms, termites, frogs and lizards.


The glands at the base of its sharp teeth, shaped like upturned spoons, produce enzymes that are commonly found in venom, including rattle snake venom.


Researchers think caecilian is the first group of vertebrates, within the amphibians, to develop a system of injection of venom through the teeth.


Scroll down for video


This image shows the head with the skin partially removed to show the tooth-related glands around the lips


‘We think of amphibians – frogs, toads and the like – as basically harmless,’ said Dr Edmund 'Butch' Brodie, Jr. of Utah State University in the US.


‘We know a number of amphibians store nasty, poisonous secretions in their skin to deter predators. 


'But to learn at least one can inflict injury from its mouth is extraordinary.’


Amphibians are known for their skin rich in glands containing toxins employed in passive chemical defence against predators.




This feature differs from snakes, which have an active chemical defence, injecting their venom into the prey.

A magnified image of the mouth of a ringed caecilian, Siphonops annulatus, reveals snake-like dental glands (top)


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https://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-8487181/Biologists-claim-evidence-oral-venom-glands-amphibians.html


Giant worm-like creature with spoon-shaped FANGS discovered in the Brazilian rainforest may be

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