Deep freeze! Oldest surviving commercial underground 'Ice House' used to store 300 tonnes of frozen water to supply hospitals and pubs in Georgian London is unearthed





The egg shaped chamber was constructed from red bricks and used to store ice

It was discovered during redevelopment work at London's Regent's Crescent 

Pioneering ice merchant William Leftwich began to use the store in the 1820s

He imported 300 tonnes of ice from Norway during a 1,240 mile round trip


 

1780년대 영국의 가장 오래된 상업용 지하 '얼음집' 발굴 


300톤의 냉동수 저장


 1780년대부터 조지왕 시대의 런던의 병원과 술집에 공급하기 위한 300톤의 얼음을 저장하던 가장 오래된 상업용 거대한 지하'얼음집'이 발굴되었다.


붉은 벽돌로 지어진 이 달걀 모양의 방은 리젠트 크레센트의 재개발 지역에서 발견되었다.

이 시설은 19세기 초에 버킹엄 궁전을 지은 유명한 웨일스의 건축가 존 내쉬에 의해 설계되었다




오래된 이 지하 얼음 집은 기업가 겸 선구적인 얼음 상인 윌리엄 레프트위치에 의해 1820년대 부터 사용되었다.

그는 1,900km 거리의 노르웨이를 왕복하며 300톤에 달하는 얼음을 수입했다.


황기철 콘페이퍼 에디터 큐레이터

Ki Cheol Hwang, conpaper editor, curator


edited by kcontents


By TIM COLLINS FOR MAILONLINE

PUBLISHED: 10:05 GMT, 28 December 2018 | UPDATED: 13:41 GMT, 28 December 2018


A huge underground Ice House dating from the 1780s that was used as a store for nearby pubs and hospitals has been unearthed in London.


Constructed from red bricks, the egg-shaped chamber was discovered during redevelopment work at Regent's Crescent.


A huge underground Ice House dating from the 1780s that was used as a store for nearby pubs and 

hospitals has been unearthed in London. Buildings archaeologists record the interior of the Regent's 

Crescent ice house




The landmark grade I listed terrace was designed by acclaimed Welsh architect John Nash, who also built Buckingham Palace, in the early 19th century.


The older underground Ice House was used by entrepreneur and pioneering ice merchant William Leftwich.


 

The chamber itself - which measures 7.5m by 9.5m (24ft 7in by 31ft 2in) - survived the Blitz, despite the 

destruction of the mews houses above. The subterranean Ice House would have been one of the largest of

 its kind when first built


Mr Leftwich imported 300 tonnes of ice from the lakes of Norway in the 1820s to be stored in the cooling chamber.




Clean ice was used to numb patients for medical and dental procedures, as well as for preserving food and creating exotic frozen delicacies.


The chamber itself - which measures 7.5m by 9.5m (24ft 7in by 31ft 2in) - survived the Blitz, despite the destruction of the mews houses above. 


The subterranean Ice House would have been one of the largest of its kind when first built. 

Samuel Dash, who had a family link to the brewing industry, is believed to be behind its original construction.


Decades later, it let Mr Leftwich store and supply high quality ice to London's Georgian elites, long before it was possible to manufacture ice artificially. 


The Ice House was later used by entrepreneur and pioneering ice merchant William Leftwich. Workers saw 

blocks of ice from a frozen lake in Norway, around 1900




It was fashionable at the time to serve all manner of frozen deserts and other dishes at lavish banquets.

Demand was also high from catering traders, medical institutions and food retailers. 


Ice was normally collected from local canals and lakes in winter and stored, but it was often dirty and the supply was unreliable.


Mr Leftwich was one of first people to recognise the potential for profit in imported ice.


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https://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-6535025/Commercial-ice-house-Georgian-era-unearthed-near-Regents-Park.html

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