From worms to clams, construction robot research uses nature as a guide

Peter Kenter September 2, 2020


It takes a lot of work to develop a construction robot from the ground up.


Some robotics researchers are applying the discipline of biomimetics to the task — letting biology supply the heavy lifting by taking advantage of millions of years of evolution to build robots that incorporate the animal kingdom’s most amazing innovations.


SUBMITTED PHOTO - GE researchers at Penn State University are working on a project to mimic the digging capabilities of the earthworm. Lead researcher Deepak Trivedi’s robot worm prototype is several feet long and uses its hydraulic “muscles” to expand, contract and move forward, earthworm-style.


Researchers at MIT have explored the possibilities of RoboClam, a mechanical cousin of expert digger the Atlantic razor clam. Like its biological counterpart, RoboClam manipulates its shell to “fluidize” soil, which reduces burrowing drag. The researchers envision a self-contained, upsized RoboClam digging undersea tunnels for cable installations, or digging deep into land-based soil.




GE researchers at Penn State University are working on a project to mimic the digging capabilities of nature’s topnotch tunneller, the earthworm. The research is part of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency’s Underminer program, which aims to demonstrate the feasibility of a robot that can efficiently bore tactical tunnels to support military operations. Lead researcher Deepak Trivedi’s robot worm prototype is several feet long and uses its hydraulic “muscles” to expand, contract and move forward, earthworm-style.


His current project goal: to create a robot that can move at a speed of 10 centimetres per second and dig a tunnel 500 metres long and 10 centimetres in diameter.


Canadian researcher Jekan Thanga, an assistant professor at the Department of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering at the University of Arizona, is focusing research on construction robots that can build infrastructure on the moon or Mars. But large, complex “gold-plated” robots are costly to develop and transport into space. Any malfunction in such a robot could jeopardize its mission.


Thanga’s approach? Look to nature to deliver a more cost-effective swarm of smaller and less complex robots that take their cues from colonies of ants, bees and termites working together to build complex structures.


“These robots, like the insects that inspire them, are individually simple and disposable, have limited capabilities and perhaps a limited lifespan,” says Thanga. “But together, like the science-fiction Transformers, their efforts are very robust.”


Thanga and his team are currently devising prototypes for a NASA robotic lunar or Mars base construction team that could excavate soil, sift through dust to find appropriate construction material and then produce building blocks and glass-like adhesive material using solar-heat-powered 3D printers. Sent far ahead of humans, the robots could build roadways, landing pads, utility trenches and other structures.


“The controllers that activate the ‘bots are not human programmed,” says Thanga. “Instead they are evolved using an artificial Darwinian process in computer simulation. It’s almost like breeding organisms, but their ‘genes’ represent robotic capabilities and attributes. We give them blueprints and they compete to complete them. The ones allowed to live and reproduce are those who best solve the task.”


After several thousand generations of evolution, the robots can develop co-operative strategies and act as a single entity. Each individual robot doesn’t have to achieve 100 per cent reliability.


Even at 60 to 90 per cent reliability, they can cover for each other. If one robot fails to clear an area properly, the next one can fix the oversight.




While many proposals for off-Earth bases begin with nuclear energy, the robot brigade would be powered by renewable sources, increasing their autonomy and eliminating the large payloads required to develop off-Earth nuclear capability.


Thanga, whose father is a construction engineer, says he doesn’t support the development of robots with the intent of eliminating the jobs of skilled tradespeople. But he does see potential for teams of construction ’bots on Earth.


“Our philosophy is to get robots to complete tasks that are dull, dirty and dangerous,” he says. “One task we see them undertaking is large-scale terraforming to reverse desertification. They could demonstrate end-to-end capabilities, converting seawater to fresh water, building irrigation canals, then growing grass and eventually trees to create more dense ecosystems. It would be a great project that human crews wouldn’t really want to do.”


SUBMITTED PHOTO – Canadian researcher Jekan Thanga, an assistant professor at the Department of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering, University of Arizona, is focusing research on construction robots that can build infrastructure on the moon or Mars and are inspired by insects. Thanga and his team are currently devising prototypes for a NASA robotic lunar or Mars base construction team that could excavate soil, sift through dust to find appropriate construction material and then produce building blocks and glass-like adhesive material using solar-heat-powered 3D printers.

https://canada.constructconnect.com/dcn/news/technology/2020/09/from-worms-to-clams-construction-robot-research-uses-nature-as-a-guide






지렁이부터 바지락까지 건설로봇연구는 자연을 모방한다 

   펜 주립대학의 GE 연구원들은 지렁이의 능력을 모방하는 프로젝트를 연구하고 있다. 수석 연구원 Deepak Trivedi의 로봇 웜 프로토타입은 수 m 길이로, 지렁이 스타일의 확장, 수축, 전진하기 위해 유압 "근육"을 사용한다.


건설로봇을 개발하려면 처음부터 많은 노력이 필요하다.


일부 로봇 공학 연구자들은 생물학 분야를 이 과제에 적용하고 있다. 즉, 생물학이 동물의 왕국의 가장 놀라운 혁신을 통합하는 로봇을 만들기 위해 수백만 년 동안 진화된 능력을 아용하여 무거운 물건을 들 수 있도록 하는 것이다.




MIT의 연구원들은 대서양 맛조개를 캐는 전문가의 기계적 사촌인 로보클램의 가능성을 탐구해 왔다. 생물학적 상대와 마찬가지로 로보클램은 껍질을 조작하여 흙을 "유체화"시켜 굴착 항력을 감소시킨다. 연구원들은 크기가 큰 로보클람이 케이블 설치용 해저 터널을 파거나 육지 토양을 깊이 파는 것을 상상해본다.


Archello

edited by kcontents


펜 주립대학의 GE 연구자들은 지렁이인 자연 최고의 땅 파는 능력의 발굴 능력을 모방하는 프로젝트를 연구하고 있다. 이번 연구는 국방고등연구계획국의 언더맨더 프로그램의 일환으로 군사작전을 지원하기 위해 전술터널을 효율적으로 뚫을 수 있는 로봇의 타당성을 입증하기 위한 것이다. 수석 연구원 Deepak Trivedi의 로봇 웜 프로토타입은 수 피트 길이로, 지렁이 스타일의 확장, 수축, 전진하기 위해 유압 "근육"을 사용한다.


그의 현재 프로젝트 목표는 초당 10 센티미터의 속도로 움직일 수 있는 로봇을 만들어 길이 500미터, 지름 10 센티미터의 터널을 파는 것이다.


애리조나대 항공우주기계공학과 조교수인 캐나다 연구원 제칸 탄가(Jekan Thanga)는 달이나 화성에 인프라를 구축할 수 있는 건설로봇에 대한 연구를 집중하고 있다. 그러나 크고 복잡한 "금도금 로봇"은 우주로 개발, 운반하는데 비용이 많이 든다. 그러한 로봇의 어떤 오작동도 그 임무를 위태롭게 할 수 있다.




"이 로봇들은, 그들을 고무시키는 곤충들처럼, 단순하고 일회용이며, 제한된 능력과 아마도 제한된 수명을 가지고 있다,"라고 탄가는 말한다. "하지만 공상과학소설 트랜스포머처럼 그들의 노력은 매우 건실하다."


탄가와 그의 팀은 현재 토양을 발굴하고, 적절한 건축 자재를 찾기 위해 먼지를 걸러내고, 태양열로 움직이는 3D 프린터를 사용하여 빌딩 블록과 유리처럼 접착된 재료를 생산할 수 있는 NASA 로봇 달 또는 화성 기지 건설 팀의 시제품을 고안하고 있다. 인간보다 훨씬 앞서 보내진 로봇들은 도로, 착륙대, 유틸리티 참호 그리고 다른 구조물들을 지을 수 있었다.


Nextgo

edited by kcontents


Tanga는 "봇을 작동시키는 컨트롤러는 인간이 프로그래밍한 것이 아니다"라고 말한다. "대신 컴퓨터 시뮬레이션에서 인공 다윈 과정을 사용하여 진화한다. 그것은 거의 번식 유기체와 같지만, 그들의 'gen'은 로봇의 능력과 속성을 나타낸다. 우리는 그들에게 청사진을 주고 그들은 그것들을 완성하기 위해 경쟁한다. 살고 번식할 수 있도록 허용된 것은 그 일을 가장 잘 해결하는 사람들이다."


수천 세대의 진화 후에, 로봇들은 협동 전략을 개발하고 단일 개체로 활동할 수 있다. 각각의 개별 로봇은 100% 신뢰성을 달성하지 않아도 된다.


60~90%의 신뢰성에서도 서로를 커버할 수 있다. 로봇 한 대가 한 지역을 제대로 치우지 못하면 다음 로봇은 감시를 고칠 수 있다.


황기철 콘페이퍼 에디터

Ki Chul Hwang Conpaper editor curator

kcontents

Posted by engi, conpaper Engi-

댓글을 달아 주세요