Solar-powered moisture harvester collects and cleans water from air


(Nanowerk News) Access to clean water remains one of the biggest challenges facing humankind. A breakthrough by engineers at The University of Texas at Austin may offer a new solution through solar-powered technology that absorbs moisture from the air and returns it as clean, usable water.


AUSTIN, Texas — Access to clean water remains one of the biggest challenges facing humankind. A breakthrough by engineers at The University of Texas at Austin may offer a new solution through solar-powered technology that absorbs moisture from the air and returns it as clean, usable water./fli.institute

edited by kcontents


 

공기 중에서 깨끗한 물을 수확할 수 있는 새로운 신소재


   미국 텍사스대학(The University of Texas at Austin)과 중국 남경사범대학(Nanjing Normal University)의 연구진은 공기 중의 수분을 흡수해서 깨끗한 물을 만들 수 있는 신소재를 개발했다. 이 기술은 다량의 물을 보유할 수 있는 슈퍼 스펀지(super sponge)를 활용하고, 이러한 스펀지는 하이드로겔, 겔-폴리머 하이브리드 재료로 구성되어 있다.


인류가 직면하고 있는 가장 큰 문제 중의 하나는 깨끗한 물이 부족하다는 것이다. 따라서 이 기술은 빈곤에 시달리는 지역, 개발도상국, 재난 상황, 수해 지역 등에 매우 유용하게 적용될 수 있을 것이다.


이번 연구진은 물 흡수성이 높고 가열 시에 물을 방출할 수 있는 새로운 하이드로겔을 만들었다. 이 하이드로겔은 습기가 높은 환경과 건조한 기후 조건 하에서 성공적으로 작동한다는 것이 입증되었다. 이것은 깨끗하고 안전한 식수 공급에 매우 중요하다.


대기에는 약 5만 입방 킬로미터의 물이 존재한다. 이 새로운 시스템은 저렴한 비용의 소형 휴대용 여과 장치를 만드는데 적용될 수 있을 것이다.


작동 방식은 간단하다. 하이드로겔을 외부에 놓아두기만 하면 물이 모이게 된다. 수집된 물은 햇빛에 노출될 때까지 하이드로겔 속에 존재한다. 햇빛 아래에서 약 5 분 후에 물이 방출되게 된다. 이 하이드로겔은 흡습성(수분 흡수)과 열 반응성 친수성(가열시 물을 방출하는 능력)을 동시에 가지고 있다.


이 새로운 신소재는 대기 중의 수분을 수집하고 햇빛 아래에서 깨끗한 물을 생산할 수 있다. 이것은 냉장고와 유사한 원리로 작동한다. 대부분의 냉장고는 수증기 응축 과정을 통해 냉기를 유지한다. 이런 응축 과정 동안에 주변의 물을 흡수하게 된다. 그러나 일반적인 냉장고는 작업을 수행하는데 많은 에너지를 필요로 한다. 그러나 이번 방식은 단지 태양 에너지만을 필요로 하고, 평균 가구의 일일 물 수요를 소형 장비로 충족시킬 수 있다. 프로토타입 테스트를 거쳤을 때, 하이드로겔 1 킬로그램 당 최대 50 리터의 물을 생산할 수 있었다.


이 새로운 기술은 기존의 태양열 집수 시스템 또는 다른 흡습 기술을 대체하는데 크게 기여할 것이다. 이 연구결과는 저널 Advanced Materials에 “Super Moisture-Absorbent Gels for All-Weather Atmospheric Water Harvesting” 라는 제목으로 게재되었다(https://doi.org/10.1002/adma.201806446).

ndsl.kr


edited by kcontents


The breakthrough, described in a recent issue of the journal Advanced Materials ("Super Moisture-Absorbent Gels for All-Weather Atmospheric Water Harvesting"), could be used in disaster situations, water crises or poverty-stricken areas and developing countries. The technology relies on hydrogels, gel-polymer hybrid materials designed to be "super sponges" that can retain large amounts of water.


      


A research team led by Guihua Yu in UT Austin's Cockrell School of Engineering combined hydrogels that are both highly water absorbent and can release water upon heating. This unique combination has been successfully proved to work in humid and dry weather conditions and is crucial to enabling the production of clean, safe drinking water from the air.


With an estimated 50,000 cubic kilometers of water contained in the atmosphere, this new system could tap into those reserves and potentially lead to small, inexpensive and portable filtration systems.


"We have developed a completely passive system where all you need to do is leave the hydrogel outside and it will collect water," said Fei Zhao, a postdoctoral researcher on Yu's team and co-author of the study. "The collected water will remain stored in the hydrogel until you expose it to sunlight. After about five minutes under natural sunlight, the water releases."


This technology builds upon a 2018 breakthrough made by Yu and Zhao in which they developed a solar-powered water purification innovation using hydrogels that cleans water from any source using only solar energy. The team's new innovation takes that work a step further by using the water that already exists in the atmosphere. For both hydrogel-based technologies, Yu and his research team developed a way to combine materials that possess both hygroscopic (water-absorbing) qualities and thermal-responsive hydrophilicity (the ability to release water upon simple heating).


 

Manufacturing.net

edited by kcontents


"The new material is designed to both harvest moisture from the air and produce clean water under sunlight, avoiding intensive energy consumption," said Yu, an associate professor of materials science and mechanical engineering.




Harvesting water from moisture is not exactly a new concept. Most refrigerators keep things cool through a vapor condensation process. However, the common fridge requires lots of energy to perform that action. The UT team's technology requires only solar power, is compact and can still produce enough water to meet the daily needs of an average household. Prototype tests showed daily water production of up to 50 liters per kilogram of hydrogel.


Representing a novel strategy to improve upon atmospheric water harvesting techniques being used today, the technology could also replace core components in existing solar-powered water purification systems or other moisture-absorbing technologies.

Yu and his team have filed a patent, and Yu is working with UT's Office of Technology Commercialization on the licensing and commercialization of this innovative class of hydrogels.

Source: University of Texas at Austin

https://www.nanowerk.com/nanotechnology-news2/newsid=52365.php


 kcontents

 
 
 
Posted by engi, conpaper engi-